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Penis and vagina

We are human being ,we need to learnt our-self how to maintain our body. No need to shame,here we will discussed about the basic of Penis and Vagina ,also give some tips to avoid some sexual problems.

Male Reproductive System ( Penis )

The penis is located in the pubic region superior to the scrotum and inferior to the umbilicus along the body’s midline
The male reproductive system includes the scrotum, testes, spermatic ducts, sex glands, and penis. These organs work together to produce sperm, the male gamete, and the other components of semen. These organs also work together to deliver semen out of the body and into the vagina where it can fertilize egg cells to produce offspring.

The male reproductive system includes the scrotum, testes, spermatic ducts, sex glands, and penis. These organs work together to produce sperm, the male gamete, and the other components of semen. These organs also work together to deliver semen out of the body and into the vagina where it can fertilize egg cells to produce offspring.

The penis is located in the pubic region superior to the scrotum and inferior to the umbilicus along the body’s midline. It is made up of 3 major regions: the root, body, and glans.

  • The root of the penis connects the penis to the bones of the pelvis via several tough ligaments.
  • Roughly cylindrical in shape, the body of the penis is the largest region. Large masses of erectile tissue in the body allow this region to harden and expand greatly during sexual stimulation.
  • The glans is the enlarged tip of the penis that contains the urethral orifice where semen and urine exit the body. Erectile tissue in the glans causes this region to harden and expand in width during sexual stimulation.

Histology
The penis is an organ made of several distinct tissue layers. The outside of the penis is covered with skin that is continuous with the skin of the surrounding pubic region. Many sensory receptors in the penis’ skin allow it to receive sensory stimulation during sexual intercourse. Deep to the skin of the penis is a layer of subcutaneous tissue containing blood vessels and protein fibers that loosely anchor the skin to the underlying tissue.

Under the subcutaneous tissue is a tough and elastic layer of fibrous connective tissue known as the tunica albuginea. The tunica albuginea plays an important role by providing strength and support to the penis when it becomes erect. Inside the tunica albuginea are three masses of erectile tissue: the two corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum. The corpora cavernosa (singular: corpus cavernosum) fill the left and right dorsal regions of the penile body, while the corpus spongiosum surrounds the urethra on the ventral side of the body and in the glans. These regions of erectile tissue fill with blood to harden and enlarge the penis during times of sexual excitement.

Functions
The penis functions as both a reproductive organ and an excretory organ. As a reproductive organ, the penis becomes erect during sexual intercourse in order to deliver semen more effectively into the vagina. Semen travels through the urethra to the tip of the penis where it is ejaculated out of the body.

As an excretory organ, the penis delivers urine out of the body through the urethra.

Penis health: Identify and prevent problems

Penis health involves more than erections. Find out the most common penis problems and strategies to promote penis health.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Penis health is an important part of your health — and it goes beyond your ability to get and keep an erection, ejaculate, and reproduce.

Penis problems can be a sign of an underlying health condition. Ongoing health issues affecting your penis also can impact other areas of your life, causing stress or relationship problems and harming your self-confidence. Know the signs and symptoms of penis problems and what you can do to protect your penis health.

What affects penis health?

Various factors can affect penis health — some modifiable and some not. For example:

  • Unprotected sex. You can contract a sexually transmitted infection if you have unprotected sex.
  • Heart disease and diabetes. Many conditions that lead to heart disease, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, can also cause erectile dysfunction.
  • Certain medications and treatments. Certain medications and treatments can affect your penis health. For example, surgical removal of the prostate gland (radical prostatectomy) and surrounding tissue as treatment for prostate cancer might cause urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction.
  • Smoking. Along with other health risks, smoking also increases your chances of having erectile dysfunction.
  • Hormone levels. Hormone imbalances, especially testosterone deficiency, have been linked to erectile dysfunction. Obesity can also result in lower testosterone levels.
  • Psychological problems. If you experience an erection problem, you might be concerned that it’ll happen again — causing anxiety or depression. This can lead to further problems with erections.
  • Neurological conditions. Stroke, spinal cord and back injuries, multiple sclerosis, and dementia can affect the transfer of nerve impulses from the brain to the penis, causing erectile dysfunction.
  • Getting older. Erectile dysfunction and other sexual dysfunctions become more common as you age. Testosterone levels also decline normally over time.
  • Piercings. A penis piercing can cause a skin infection and also disrupt urinary flow. Depending where the piercing is placed, it might also worsen your ability to achieve an erection or orgasm.
  • Aggressive or acrobatic sex or masturbation. If your penis is bent suddenly or forcefully while erect, rarely the trauma can cause a penis fracture. It might also lead to permanent curvature, even if the penis doesn’t fracture.

What are the most common penis problems?

Conditions that can involve your penis include:

  • Erection or ejaculation problems. These might include the inability to get and keep an erection firm enough for sex (erectile dysfunction) or, uncommonly, a persistent and usually painful erection that isn’t caused by sexual stimulation or arousal (priapism). Other concerns include the inability to ejaculate, premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, painful ejaculation, reduced ejaculation or retrograde ejaculation, when semen enters the bladder instead of emerging through the penis.
  • Anorgasmia. In some cases, men might not be able to achieve an orgasm despite adequate stimulation. This might reflect hormonal problems, such as low testosterone, or indicate an underlying problem with the nerves. Medications or diseases such as diabetes might make this condition more likely.
  • Changes in libido. Reduced desire for sex (libido) can be due to several conditions, including a hormonal imbalance, relationship issues or even depression. Significant and abrupt increases in libido, particularly in older men, might be due to substance use or conditions affecting the brain. Discuss an abrupt change in libido with your doctor.
  • Sexually transmitted infections. Various sexually transmitted infections can affect the penis, including genital warts, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and genital herpes. Common signs and symptoms include painful urination, penis discharge, and sores or blisters on the penis or in the genital area.
  • Problems with the foreskin. A condition known as phimosis occurs when the foreskin on an uncircumcised penis can’t be retracted from the penis head. This can lead to infections, as well as cause painful urination and erections.

    Paraphimosis occurs when the foreskin can’t be returned to its normal position after being retracted. This condition can cause painful swelling of the penis and impaired blood flow.

  • Other diseases and conditions. A yeast infection can cause a reddish rash and white patches on the penis. Inflammation of the head of the penis (balanitis) might cause pain and a foul discharge. Peyronie’s disease, a chronic condition that involves the development of abnormal scar tissue in tissues inside the penis, might result in bent or painful erections.
  • Penile cancer — which might begin as a blister on the foreskin, head or shaft of the penis and then become a wartlike growth that discharges watery pus — also is a rare possibility.

What are signs or symptoms of penis problems?

Consult your doctor as soon as possible if you have:

  • Changes in the way you ejaculate
  • Bleeding during urination or ejaculation
  • Warts, bumps, lesions or a rash on your penis or in your genital area
  • A severely bent penis or curvature that causes pain or interferes with sexual activity
  • A burning sensation when you urinate
  • Discharge from your penis
  • Severe pain after trauma to your penis
  • Abrupt increases in sexual desire, particularly in older men
  • Significant declines in sexual desire

What can I do to keep my penis healthy?

You can take steps to protect your penis health and overall health. For example:

  • Be sexually responsible. Use condoms or maintain a mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who’s been tested and is free of sexually transmitted infections.
  • Get vaccinated. If you’re age 26 or younger, consider the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to help prevent genital warts.
  • Stay physically active. Moderate physical activity can significantly reduce your risk of erectile dysfunction.
  • Practice good hygiene. If you’re not circumcised, regularly clean beneath your foreskin with soap and water. Be sure to return your foreskin to its normal position after sex.
  • Know your medications. Discuss medication use and possible side effects with your doctor.
  • Pay attention to your mental health. Seek treatment for depression and other mental health conditions.
  • Stop smoking and limit the amount of alcohol you drink. If you smoke, take the first step and decide to quit — then ask your doctor for help. Excess alcohol can lower testosterone levels. Experts recommend that men have no more than two drinks a day.
  • Make healthy choices. Maintaining a healthy weight, can help reduce the risk of developing abnormal cholesterol, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. A healthy lifestyle might also help prevent erectile dysfunction.

Not all penis problems can be prevented. However, routinely examining your penis can give you greater awareness of the condition of your penis and help you detect changes. Regular checkups also can help ensure that problems affecting your penis are diagnosed as soon as possible.

While you might find it difficult to discuss problems affecting your penis with your doctor, don’t let embarrassment prevent you from taking charge of your health.

Female Reproductive System ( Vagina )

The inner lining of the vagina is made of non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelial tissue. This tissue provides protection from friction to the underlying layers of the vagina. Watery secretions produced by the vaginal epithelium lubricate the vagina and have an acidic pH to prevent the growth of bacteria and yeast. The acidic pH also makes the vagina an inhospitable environment for sperm, which has resulted in males producing alkaline seminal fluid to neutralize the acid and improve the survival of sperm.

Deep to the epithelial layer is the lamina propria, a layer of connective tissue with many elastin fibers that allow the vagina to stretch. A layer of smooth muscle tissue located deep to the lamina propria allows the vagina to expand and contract during sexual intercourse and childbirth. Surrounding the smooth muscle is the outermost layer of the vagina known as the tunica externa. The tunica externa is a layer of dense irregular connective tissue that forms the outer protective shell of the vagina.

During sexual intercourse, the vagina functions as the receptacle for the penis and carries sperm to the uterus and fallopian tubes. The elastic structure of the vagina allows it to stretch in both length and diameter to accommodate the penis. During childbirth, the vagina acts as the birth canal to conduct the fetus from the uterus and out of the mother’s body. Once again, the vagina’s elasticity allows it to greatly increase its diameter to accommodate the fetus. Finally, the vagina provides a passageway for menstrual flow from the uterus to exit the body during menstruation.

20 Things Every Woman Should Know About Her Vagina

t’s amazing how much misinformation is out there about the vagina. Given how fascinated our society is with the female body, you’d think we’d be a little more informed. But from what I discovered while soliciting questions for my book What’s Up Down There? Questions You’d Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend, many of us still have a lot to learn.

20 Things Every Woman Should Know About Her Vagina

To help out, I’ve compiled a list of 20 things I believe everyone should know about the vagina.

  1. While men do pee out of the penis, women do not pee out of the vagina. There are three holes and countless other sexy structures. Learn to know your anatomy.  Get a hand mirror and go to town.  From front to back, the urethra is the first hole, the vagina is the second, and the anus is the third. Don’t laugh! You’d be amazed how many people don’t know this.
  2. The vagina doesn’t connect to your lung. If you lose something in there, don’t worry. Reach in all the way and pull it out. Do not–I repeat, do not–go hunting for whatever you’ve lost with a pair of pliers. If you think you put something in there and you can’t find it, chances are good that it’s simply not there. Think of your vagina as being like a sock. If you lose a banana in a sock…it stays in the sock.
  3. Yes, it’s true–your vagina can fall out. Not to belabor the sock metaphor, but it can turn inside out just like a worn out sweat sock and hang between your legs as you get older. But don’t fret; this condition–called pelvic prolapse– can be fixed.
  4. Contrary to popular mythology, there’s no such thing as being revirginized. Once you lose it, it’s gone. Just so you know.
  5. You can catch sexually transmitted diseases even if you use a condom. Sorry to break it to you, but the skin of the vulva can still touch infectious skin of the scrotum–and BAM!Warts. Herpes. Molluscum contagiosum. Pubic lice. So pick your partners carefully.
  6. The vagina is like a bicep. Use it or lose it. If you don’t have a partner, pick up a battery-operated boyfriend to help keep things healthy as you age. But don’t worry–it’s usually not an issue until after menopause, when fragile vaginal tissue can scar and shrink. If properly tended, your vagina will be able to pleasure you until the day you leave this life.
  7. Every vulva is different and special. Some lips hang down. Some are tucked up neatly inside. Some are long. Some are short. Some are even. Some aren’t. All are beautiful. You’re perfect just the way you are.
  8. Most women don’t have orgasms from intercourse alone. The clitoris is where the action is. Most women who do orgasm during sex have figured out how to hit their sweet spot, either from positioning or from direct stimulation of the clitoris with fingers.
  9. If you’re hunting for your G Spot, be patient. Stimulating this area usually requires more time and deeper stimulation than most people think. Try using a finger in a “come hither” motion to stimulate the front wall of the vagina, where the G spot lives. If you can’t find it, don’t worry. You’re not alone. Many can’t–and it’s definitely not critical to having a fulfilling romp in the hay.
  10. How you choose to decorate is completely personal. Waxing, shaving, tattooing, piercing, or simply going au natural. It’s your choice, and don’t let anyone else pressure you into doing something that doesn’t resonate with you.
  11. The vagina doesn’t need to be douched. As Eve Ensler says, ““My vagina doesn’t need to be cleaned up. It smells good already. Don’t try to decorate. Don’t believe him when he tells you it smells like rose petals when it’s supposed to smell like pussy. That’s what they’re doing – trying to clean it up, make it smell like bathroom spray or a garden. All those douche sprays–floral, berry, rain. I don’t want my pussy to smell like rain. All cleaned up like washing a fish after you cook it. I want to taste the fish. That’s why I ordered it.” Amen, sister. I second that.
  12. The only cancer a Pap smear screens for is cervical cancer. It doesn’t check your ovaries, your uterus, or your colon, so even if you don’t need yearly Paps, you still need to have a yearly pelvic exam.
  13. How much vaginal discharge you make varies widely. Some normal, healthy women spew loads of discharge and need to wear panty liners every day. Others are bone dry. As long as you are not at risk of STD’s and you have no itching, burning, or odor, you’re probably just fine. If in doubt, see your gynecologist.
  14. Menstrual blood is supposed to clot, so don’t freak out. Usually, what you think are clots are just pieces of uterine lining. As long as you’re not losing too much blood, small clots during your period need not concern you. Clots are just nature’s way of keeping you from bleeding too much. Blood is supposed to clot. It’s when the clots are large or you start to hemorrhage that we start to worry.
  15. Lots of vaginas need help lubing up during sex, especially as you get older. Don’t be afraid to slick on some lubricant like K-Y Jelly or Astroglide. Or try coconut oil, which is a great natural lubricant- but don’t blame me if you find yourself hankering for a post-coital macaroon.
  16. Vaginal farts (some call them “queefs” or “varts”) happen to almost all women at one time or another, especially during sex or other forms of exercise. Don’t be embarrassed. You’re perfectly normal.
  17. Vaginas stretch out when you have babies vaginally. It’s natural but it can leave you feeling a bit loosey goosey. Kegel exercises that contract the muscles of the vagina really do help. To do them, practice stopping the stream of urine when you pee. There–that’s the muscle! Now contract and relax it 10 X for three or more sets several times per day.
  18. Some women do ejaculate during orgasm, but you’re normal if you don’t. The controversial “female ejaculation” most likely represents two different phenomena. If it’s a small amount of milky fluid, it likely comes from the paraurethral glands inside the urethra. If it’s a cup, it’s probably pee. Many times, it may be a little bit of both. But don’t stress out about peeing on yourself. Put a towel under you and surrender to the experience.
  19. Sex shouldn’t hurt, but it does for many women. If you’re one of those women, see your doctor. So many women are too embarrassed to say anything, so they suffer in silence. There are things we docs can do to help you.
  20. Safe sex (or even just orgasm alone) is good for you. Benefits include lowering your risk of heart disease and stroke, reducing your risk of breast cancer, bolstering your immune system, helping you sleep, making you appear more youthful, improving your fitness, regulating menstrual cycles, relieving menstrual cramps, helping with chronic pain, reducing the risk of depression, lowering stress levels, and improving self esteem. So go at it, girlfriends!

So there you go. There you have it.  It’s important to know this kind of stuff, because you can’t truly love all of yourself until you love your girly parts.  Your vagina is the portal to all things magical in your life. Once you own and accept this part of yourself, you can do and be anything you choose.  The more you know, the more you’re empowered to live life out loud, love fully, and really rock this life.

If you like what you hear, you won’t want to miss my book What’s Up Down There? Questions You’d Only Ask Your Gynecologist If She Was Your Best Friend.  Imagine being out with your girlfriends, one of whom is a gynecologist. The witty banter turns to sex, girly parts, and intimate storytelling, and next thing you know, you’re asking about everything you’ve been dying to know but were too embarrassed to ask even your own gynecologist. As outrageously funny as it is empowering, this book reveals how to love yourself and your body- and will have you recommending it to every woman you know.

Source – From Internet and from real life (getting help from my Doctor friends)